Assistant Professor of Sociology

6 Lundy
319-363-1323 ext. 1860
thouston@mtmercy.edu

BA    Texas State University
MA    Texas State University
PhD   University of Georgia

Assistant Professor of Sociology Dr. Taylor Houston joined Mount Mercy in 2016. He received a Ph.D. in Sociology and completed a graduate certificate at the Institute for Women’s Studies from the University of Georgia. He also holds a Master of Arts in Sociology and Bachelor of Arts in History from Texas State University.

Taylor’s areas of specialization include gender, race, class, sexuality, inequality, human trafficking, social movements, and qualitative methodologies. His research seeks to understand how inequalities shape the institutions that social movements challenge, the actors engaging in collective action, and the community response to such activism. His most recent research project is a qualitative analysis of a statewide social movement addressing the commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC), more commonly known as child sex trafficking. Taylor is also interested in issues of masculinity as well as feminist theories and methods. He has presented his research at the American Sociological Association, the Society for the Study of Social Problems, and the Southern Sociological Society. For more information see his curriculum vitae.

Taylor has experience teaching a number of undergraduate courses ranging in subject matter, including: Introduction to Sociology, Research Methods, Introduction to Women’s Studies, Marriage and the Family, Race and Ethnicity, Violence in Society, and the Sociology of Gender among others.

Publications

Houston, Taylor. 2017. A Gender Integrative Approach to the Anti-CSEC Movement in Georgia. Journal of Human Trafficking 3(2or3).

Houston, Taylor. 2015. Universal Child Victims and Normal Guys: The Anti-CSEC Movement’s All-Inclusive Frames. Social Currents 2(2): 182-199.

Houston, Taylor. 2012. The Homosocial Construction of Alternative Masculinities: Men in Indie Rock Bands. The Journal of Men’s Studies 20(2): 158-175.