Introducing the Martin-Herold College of Nursing & Health

Herolds

Introducing the Martin-Herold College of Nursing & Health

Mount Mercy’s nursing program now has a name and identity all its own—the Martin-Herold College of Nursing & Health—thanks to a ’61 Mercy Hospital School of Nursing graduate and her husband.

MMU trustee Ron Herold and his wife Paula (Martin) Herold RN ’61 gave a life-changing gift to establish Mount Mercy’s first-ever named college. Working in pediatrics and maternity nursing in the Twin Cities, Paula wants future students to have some of the same experiences she did.  

Herolds

“We want to turn our success and appreciation into support for the community,” say the Herolds. “Mercy nursing has been a strong influence in our lives, and it’s our honor to invest in the continued and future success of Mount Mercy nurses.”

Mary Tarbox ’74, professor of nursing and inaugural dean, explains that it had long been Mount Mercy’s goal to establish a school or college of nursing. “Doing so is part of becoming a mature university,” she emphasizes. 

Recent changes to the nursing program, including the addition of two new emphasis areas within the MSN program—forensic nursing and nursing informatics—and the DNP program were all part of a bigger plan. 

“It’s amazing to have been able to oversee this idea for so many years, and now be able to make it happen,” says Sharon Guthrie, associate professor of nursing and director of graduate nursing programs. As a nurse practitioner herself, Guthrie helped create the organizational structure needed to establish the Martin-Herold College of Nursing & Health.

The College will serve as a valuable umbrella for Mount Mercy’s renowned undergraduate and graduate nursing and health care programs—facilitating increased offerings and enrollment, gaining prestige among peers, providing additional resources, and addressing crucial shortages in health care.

Mary Tarbox ’74, professor of nursing and inaugural dean explains that it had long been Mount Mercy’s goal to establish a school or college of nursing. “Doing so is part of becoming a mature university,” she says. 

Donnelly

Faculty anticipate that students will feel a closer relationship with and connection to the nursing program, being able to identify with their own named college. “It sets us apart and further distinguishes us in terms of reputation and ability,” says Guthrie. “As we continue to grow, this will  bring in more opportunities for funding, whether it’s through gifts or grants.”

By naming the college after the Herolds, Mount Mercy pays tribute to the legacy that Ron and Paula have created. 

“They were —and are—the trailblazers,” Tarbox says.